Nothing would more quickly bring about the balkanization of American than a nuclear war. In the destruction or crippling of the Federal government, regional and ethnic powers would rise to fill the vacuum within the United States.

by D Jolly

Great American Politics

When I was growing up, the threat of nuclear war was real. A number of Americans that could afford it, built underground bomb shelters at their homes and stocked it with water and food. I recall drills in school where we were instructed to duck down under our desks if there was a bright white flash of light outside that wasn’t lightning. Thinking back on it now, ducking below school desk was rather futile in the event of a nuclear blast.

In 1962, many of us were prepared for a nuclear war with Russia. We learned that the Soviet Union had placed nuclear missiles in Cuba that were very capable of reaching cities in the United States. That led to the now famous showdown between US President John F. Kennedy and Soviet Union leader (First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union) Nikita Khrushchev. For several days, we were told to watch the skies and prepare for the worst, but fortunately, the Soviet Union backed down and allegedly removed the nuclear missiles from Cuba.

By the 1980s and 1990s, even though the US and Soviet Union were still enemies and both armed with nuclear weapons, the threat of nuclear war eased to a point where few people even gave it any thought. Over the next several decades, moves were made on both sides to de-escalate the threat of nuclear war by destroying some of the nuclear arsenal. During the 8-year reign of Barack Obama, our nuclear capabilities were further reduced to a third of what they were before he took office.

In the past couple of years, a couple of new comers have entered the nuclear weapon area and they are not nearly as trustworthy as the US or Russia. Iran has been actively pursuing a nuclear weapons program in spite of the hand slap they received by the Obama administration. In fact, the nuclear peace deal that Obama and then Secretary of State John Kerry brokered only allowed Iran to work harder to develop the nuclear weapons, with which they have vowed to use against Israel.

On the eastern coast of Asia, North Korea has been engaged in an active nuclear weapon program. Their leader, Kim Jong-un, Chairman of the Worker’s Party of Korea, is a loose cannon who seems deranged, power-hungry, blood thirsty and unpredictable. He has been threatening to use his nuclear weapons against the United States and our allies in the region which consist mainly of Japan and the Philippines.

Knowing this, if you were asked if you thought there would be a nuclear war sometime this century, how would you answer?

Rasmussen Reports asked likely voters if they thought there would be a nuclear war by the end of this century. Evidently, the threat and fear of nuclear war is once again becoming a common thing as 57% of likely voters responded that they believe a nuclear war will happen sometime this century and 24% saying it is VERY likely to happen. Only 32% said they believe it is unlikely to happen this century.

Personally, I would not doubt to see war involving nuclear weapons sometime this century. I would be one of the 57%, but am not confident enough that it will happen to include myself in the 24%.

For years, I’ve told people that I’m not afraid of a nuclear war for myself. In fact, I would prefer to be at ground zero if it were to happen. The thought of instantly being in the presence of my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ is a very comforting thought and something I earnestly look forward to. I would not want to be on the outskirts and end up suffering from radiation sickness or the cancerous effects of radiation exposure, nor do I treasure the thought of my kids and grandkids living in a such a world.

Is that a real fear? Yes! I fear for them, not me.